jennasday

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Scandal, season 1

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It’s been on my Netflix list for quite some time, but I finally got around to starting Scandal. For some reason I thought it was a new show, but clearly I’m mistaken – there are six seasons ready and waiting for me to watch them.

The show starts with doe-eyed Quinn Perkins on a blind-date-turned-job-interview, and follows along as she confusedly starts her job with the revered “Pope & Associates,” a firm with a murky purpose and sometimes sketchy clients. It follows along as she learns about her new job and the people she works with – particularly Olivia Pope (Kerry Washington) herself.

In the first episode it seems the show will follow Quinn as she discovers the fast-paced world of Pope & Associates, but then the story broadens to revolve around Olivia Pope herself. It tags along, straight into the scandal-laced political world where she works as a professional “fixer;” it storms into her former workplace, the White House, which naturally is at the centre of the politics and secrecy Pope works to smooth over, flare up, and otherwise handle for her clients.

The show is fast, smart, and funny. The intelligent sass reminds me of Suits, but Scandal is set in a very political world, which – combined with Olivia’s willingness to do the wrong things for the right reasons – kept me on my toes.

And I hate that this is even something I need to take note of, but the main character is smart, powerful, respected, even feared – think Harvey Specter, Don Draper, Danny Ocean. But THIS main character is a woman. Woman of colour. She’s not perfect, but she’s strong. And she’s a powerhouse. Looking forward to the day when this won’t be something that stands out.

The first season is only 7 episodes and I was into season 2 before I knew it. I’d expect nothing less from Shonda Rimes (who is clearly brilliant), but I’ll let you know when I’m finished!

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One thought on “Scandal, season 1

  1. Pingback: Lightening review: Year of Yes | jennasday

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